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J.S. Bach - Chamber Music - Miscellaneous

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Showing 1–16 of 36 results

  • 2nd Mvmt.

    Originally in g minor, transposed here to c. This arrangement has a precedent of sorts by Bach himself, in that Sonata No. 1 for Gamba, BWV 1027 seems to have originated as BWV 1039, a trio sonata for two flutes. Thus, the convertibility of music in different octaves and for different timbres (as well the number of instruments deployed) is clearly established in the repertory, even without reference to all the firm evidence we have about Baroque performance practice. In the first movement, some of the hardest passages for the recorder part are eliminated, or rather given to the keyboard player, simply by switching places between the original gamba part and the right hand of the keyboard part. Of course, the fact that these two parts are in the same style (very much as in a trio sonata, or a double concerto) is what makes this an especially viable transcriptional option. Note the alternative version in d; this one in c is a little bit more difficult. Film buffs take note that the slow movement of this sonata is featured prominently in the opening section of the 1991 movie “Truly, Madly, Deeply.”

    Recorder & Keyboard part, 2+1 pp.
    $0.50
  • 2nd Mvmt.

    Originally in g minor, transposed here to d. This arrangement has a precedent of sorts by Bach himself, in that Sonata No. 1 for Gamba, BWV 1027 seems to have originated as BWV 1039, a trio sonata for two flutes. Thus, the convertibility of music in different octaves and for different timbres (as well the number of instruments deployed) is clearly established in the repertory, even without reference to all the firm evidence we have about Baroque performance practice. Note the alternative version in c; this one in d is a little easier. Film buffs take note that the slow movement of this sonata is featured prominently in the opening section of the 1991 movie ?Truly, Madly, Deeply.?

    Recorder & Keyboard part, 2+1 pp.
    $0.50
  • 3. Allemanda

    Originally in e minor, transposed here to g.

    Recorder part, 1 pp.
    $0.50
  • BWV 1019a.3

    8 pp.
    $0.50
  • 2nd Mvmt.

    Originally in g minor, transposed here to c. This arrangement has a precedent of sorts by Bach himself, in that Sonata No. 1 for Gamba, BWV 1027 seems to have originated as BWV 1039, a trio sonata for two flutes. Thus, the convertibility of music in different octaves and for different timbres (as well the number of instruments deployed) is clearly established in the repertory, even without reference to all the firm evidence we have about Baroque performance practice. In the first movement, some of the hardest passages for the recorder part are eliminated, or rather given to the keyboard player, simply by switching places between the original gamba part and the right hand of the keyboard part. Of course, the fact that these two parts are in the same style (very much as in a trio sonata, or a double concerto) is what makes this an especially viable transcriptional option. Note the alternative version in d; this one in c is a little bit more difficult. Film buffs take note that the slow movement of this sonata is featured prominently in the opening section of the 1991 movie “Truly, Madly, Deeply.”

    Recorder part, 1 pp.
    $0.50
  • 2nd Mvmt.

    Originally in g minor, transposed here to d. This arrangement has a precedent of sorts by Bach himself, in that Sonata No. 1 for Gamba, BWV 1027 seems to have originated as BWV 1039, a trio sonata for two flutes. Thus, the convertibility of music in different octaves and for different timbres (as well the number of instruments deployed) is clearly established in the repertory, even without reference to all the firm evidence we have about Baroque performance practice. Note the alternative version in c; this one in d is a little easier. Film buffs take note that the slow movement of this sonata is featured prominently in the opening section of the 1991 movie ?Truly, Madly, Deeply.?

    Recorder part, 1 pp.
    $0.50
  • 4. Gigue

    Originally in e minor, transposed here to g.

    Recorder part, 1 pp.
    $0.50
  • 3rd Mvmt.

    Originally in g minor, transposed here to c. This arrangement has a precedent of sorts by Bach himself, in that Sonata No. 1 for Gamba, BWV 1027 seems to have originated as BWV 1039, a trio sonata for two flutes. Thus, the convertibility of music in different octaves and for different timbres (as well the number of instruments deployed) is clearly established in the repertory, even without reference to all the firm evidence we have about Baroque performance practice. In the first movement, some of the hardest passages for the recorder part are eliminated, or rather given to the keyboard player, simply by switching places between the original gamba part and the right hand of the keyboard part. Of course, the fact that these two parts are in the same style (very much as in a trio sonata, or a double concerto) is what makes this an especially viable transcriptional option. Note the alternative version in d; this one in c is a little bit more difficult. Film buffs take note that the slow movement of this sonata is featured prominently in the opening section of the 1991 movie “Truly, Madly, Deeply.”

    Recorder & Keyboard part, 8+2 pp.
    $0.50
  • 3rd Mvmt.

    Originally in g minor, transposed here to d. This arrangement has a precedent of sorts by Bach himself, in that Sonata No. 1 for Gamba, BWV 1027 seems to have originated as BWV 1039, a trio sonata for two flutes. Thus, the convertibility of music in different octaves and for different timbres (as well the number of instruments deployed) is clearly established in the repertory, even without reference to all the firm evidence we have about Baroque performance practice. Note the alternative version in c; this one in d is a little easier. Film buffs take note that the slow movement of this sonata is featured prominently in the opening section of the 1991 movie ?Truly, Madly, Deeply.?

    Recorder & Keyboard part, 8+2 pp.
    $0.50
  • Sonata, BWV 1021

    12 pp.
    $1.00
  • 3rd Mvmt.

    Originally in g minor, transposed here to c. This arrangement has a precedent of sorts by Bach himself, in that Sonata No. 1 for Gamba, BWV 1027 seems to have originated as BWV 1039, a trio sonata for two flutes. Thus, the convertibility of music in different octaves and for different timbres (as well the number of instruments deployed) is clearly established in the repertory, even without reference to all the firm evidence we have about Baroque performance practice. In the first movement, some of the hardest passages for the recorder part are eliminated, or rather given to the keyboard player, simply by switching places between the original gamba part and the right hand of the keyboard part. Of course, the fact that these two parts are in the same style (very much as in a trio sonata, or a double concerto) is what makes this an especially viable transcriptional option. Note the alternative version in d; this one in c is a little bit more difficult. Film buffs take note that the slow movement of this sonata is featured prominently in the opening section of the 1991 movie “Truly, Madly, Deeply.”

    Recorder part, 2 pp.
    $0.50
  • 3rd Mvmt.

    Originally in g minor, transposed here to d. This arrangement has a precedent of sorts by Bach himself, in that Sonata No. 1 for Gamba, BWV 1027 seems to have originated as BWV 1039, a trio sonata for two flutes. Thus, the convertibility of music in different octaves and for different timbres (as well the number of instruments deployed) is clearly established in the repertory, even without reference to all the firm evidence we have about Baroque performance practice. Note the alternative version in c; this one in d is a little easier. Film buffs take note that the slow movement of this sonata is featured prominently in the opening section of the 1991 movie ?Truly, Madly, Deeply.?

    Recorder part, 2 pp.
    $0.50
  • 1st Mvmt.

    Originally in G major, transposed here to C. If played on tenor or soprano, with F fingering, will be in the same key as original continuo part. (Our keyboard part, when done, will be in C major, to work with recorder part played by alto.) N.B.: This is the original of which BWV 1038 (q. v.) for flute, violin and continuo is an arrangement?possibly not by Bach. As for the present work, doubt exists about where the bass part originated.

    Recorder part, 1 pp.
    $0.50
  • Recorder parts for all 3 Mvmts

    Originally in g minor, transposed here to c. This arrangement has a precedent of sorts by Bach himself, in that Sonata No. 1 for Gamba, BWV 1027 seems to have originated as BWV 1039, a trio sonata for two flutes. Thus, the convertibility of music in different octaves and for different timbres (as well the number of instruments deployed) is clearly established in the repertory, even without reference to all the firm evidence we have about Baroque performance practice. In the first movement, some of the hardest passages for the recorder part are eliminated, or rather given to the keyboard player, simply by switching places between the original gamba part and the right hand of the keyboard part. Of course, the fact that these two parts are in the same style (very much as in a trio sonata, or a double concerto) is what makes this an especially viable transcriptional option. Note the alternative version in d; this one in c is a little bit more difficult. Film buffs take note that the slow movement of this sonata is featured prominently in the opening section of the 1991 movie “Truly, Madly, Deeply.”

    5 pp.
    $1.00
  • Recorder parts for all 3 Mvmts.

    Originally in g minor, transposed here to d. This arrangement has a precedent of sorts by Bach himself, in that Sonata No. 1 for Gamba, BWV 1027 seems to have originated as BWV 1039, a trio sonata for two flutes. Thus, the convertibility of music in different octaves and for different timbres (as well the number of instruments deployed) is clearly established in the repertory, even without reference to all the firm evidence we have about Baroque performance practice. Note the alternative version in c; this one in d is a little easier. Film buffs take note that the slow movement of this sonata is featured prominently in the opening section of the 1991 movie ?Truly, Madly, Deeply.?

    5 pp.
    $1.00
  • 2nd Mvmt.

    Originally in G major, transposed here to C. If played on tenor or soprano, with F fingering, will be in the same key as original continuo part. (Our keyboard part, when done, will be in C major, to work with recorder part played by alto.) N.B.: This is the original of which BWV 1038 (q. v.) for flute, violin and continuo is an arrangement?possibly not by Bach. As for the present work, doubt exists about where the bass part originated.

    Recorder part, 1 pp.
    $0.50
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