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Showing 1–16 of 138 results

  • Aria

    Fourth number from the cantata. Originally for soprano, flute, violoncello piccolo, and continuo in b minor, transposed here to d. Title means “Pray though even now as well.”

    Recorder part, 1 pp.
    $0.50
  • Fugue No. 10

    Originally in e minor, transposed here to a.

    Recorder part, 1 pp.
    $0.50
  • Fugue

    Originally in F# major, transposed here to Bb. Revised 6.13.15.

    Recorder part, 1 pp.
    $0.50
  • In C

    Originally in A major, transposed here to your choice of G or C.

    1 pp.
    $0.50
  • Chorale Prelude “Das alte Jahr vergangen ist” BWV 614

    Originally in a minor, transposed here to d. Title means: “The old year is past”. Clearly New Year’s Eve is one good time to play this.

    Recorder part, 1 pp.
    $0.50
  • Gigue—d minor version

    Originally in a minor, transposed here to d. Note that these same four movements are also available in the catalogue in the key of c. Bourr?e I and II require a change to either tenor or voice flute. To avoid this, one could use the version of this piece in c. To avoid the change of key, one could mix and match between the two versions which would necessitate using recorders either one whole tone down (in Eb) or one whole tone up (in G), in alternation with the familiar recorder in F.

    Recorder part, 1 pp.
    $0.50
  • 2nd Mvmt.

    Originally in g minor, transposed here to c. This arrangement has a precedent of sorts by Bach himself, in that Sonata No. 1 for Gamba, BWV 1027 seems to have originated as BWV 1039, a trio sonata for two flutes. Thus, the convertibility of music in different octaves and for different timbres (as well the number of instruments deployed) is clearly established in the repertory, even without reference to all the firm evidence we have about Baroque performance practice. In the first movement, some of the hardest passages for the recorder part are eliminated, or rather given to the keyboard player, simply by switching places between the original gamba part and the right hand of the keyboard part. Of course, the fact that these two parts are in the same style (very much as in a trio sonata, or a double concerto) is what makes this an especially viable transcriptional option. Note the alternative version in d; this one in c is a little bit more difficult. Film buffs take note that the slow movement of this sonata is featured prominently in the opening section of the 1991 movie “Truly, Madly, Deeply.”

    Recorder part, 1 pp.
    $0.50
  • Gnossienne No. 3

    Written in 1890 for piano solo. At original pitch here.

    Recorder part, 1 pp.
    $0.50
  • 2nd Mvmt.

    Originally in Eb major, transposed here to G.

    Recorder part, 1 pp.
    $0.50
  • 4. Sarabande

    Originally in a minor, transposed here to d. Includes an introductory commentary.

    Recorder part, 1 pp.
    $0.50
  • Opening

    Originally in e minor, transposed here to g.

    Recorder part, 1 pp.
    $0.50
  • Duet for alto and bass recorders

    1 pp.
    $0.50
  • Bartok Bagatelle for Trio

    1 pp.
    $0.50
  • Prelude

    Originally in C# major, transposed here to F.

    Recorder part, 1 pp.
    $0.50
  • Prelude No. 15, BWV 860

    Originally in G major, transposed here to F.

    Recorder part, 1 pp.
    $0.50
  • Fugue No. 4

    Originally in c# minor, transposed here to a. NB: The five pages of the keyboard part are arranged so that the page-turns should be between 1 & 2, and then 3 & 4.

    Recorder part, 1 pp.
    $0.50
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